woman off colour • person of culture

 the (in)visibilised is politicised
White, middle-aged man living somewhere in the west

White, middle-aged man living somewhere in the west

(via almost-seen)

hashtag-beirut:

Adrienne Rich, “Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law.”

hashtag-beirut:

Adrienne Rich, “Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law.”

"Until feminists are aware of the state’s involvement in protecting patriarchy as a system of power, much in the same way it protects capitalism and racism as systems, feminists will be unable to see why a reform politics, though necessary, is insufficient."

— Zillah Eisenstein

(Source: postcolonialfeminist)

Blackgirl Songs for Summer Writing.

Feminist Hurt/Feminism Hurts

[H]ow can we respond to the histories that leave some bodies, some relationships, more fragile than others? How can we face up to those histories of losing face?

We can be shattered by what we come up against.

And then we come up against it again.

We can be exhausted by what we come up against.

And then we come up against it again.

The question of survival is a political as well as life question. Perhaps survival seems too modest a political ambition. Not for some. Not at all. Survival becomes a political craft for those who, as Audre Lorde describes, “were never meant to survive”

A beautifully crafted piece by Sara Ahmed on survival, accountability and collective healing

"The prospect of gawking, exclaiming, and comparing our bodies to others that created the spectacle of the late 19th and early 20th century remains a pivotal part of the framing of black and brown bodies in contemporary America. We can trace its contours in the dehumanized prison populations, in the rhetoric of legality attached to refugees and migrants, and in the surveillance enacted upon specific faiths. Yet the community of spectators, which creates the spectacle, remains un-critically hidden."

Manan Ahmed Asif, A History of White Americans Gawking at Black and Brown Bodies

duoyen:

The house is black/Khaneh siah ast, Forough Farrokhzad, 1962

(via vul-va)

finally!

finally!

"In the end, the question is not really about the pros and cons of trigger words. The questions are around, what are the organizing practices and strategies for building movements that recognize that settler colonialism, capitalism, white supremacy and heteropatriarchy have not left us unscathed? How do we create spaces to experiment with different strategies, as well as spaces to openly assess and change these strategies as they inevitably become co-opted? How do we create movements that make us collectively accountable for healing from individual and collective trauma? How do we create critical intellectual spaces that recognize that intellectual work is not disembodied and without material effects? How do we collectively reduce harm in our intellectual and political spaces? And finally, how can we build healing movements for liberation that can include us as we actually are rather than as the peoples we are supposed to be?"

— Andrea Smith, Beyond Trigger Warnings 

(Source: loxmey, via vul-va)

militant-tendency:

"What is the source of our first suffering? It lies in the fact that we hesitated to speak. It was born in the moment when we accumulated silent things within us."

Bachelard, Poetics of Space

(via vul-va)

megh-ana:

 

Kaajal (1965)

megh-ana:

 

Kaajal (1965)

(via ladybrun)

"[E]nslaved African-origin female beings never qualified as women (because of their non-humanness, it followed logically) in the Euro-American modern world, and therefore were not interpellated to partake in the ongoing social construction and contestation of gender. The point I do want to make is that gender - a category that would have enabled a black female claim on social negotiations did not apply to ‘things’, to what was constructed as and treated as human flesh. Moreover, that very category gender emerged in western transatlantic rhetoric precisely in the context of creating a space for white women, who refused to be treated like slaves, like things."

— Sabine Broeck, Enslavement as a Regime of Western Modernity